Mango Lassi Recipe For Ataulfo Mango Champagne Mango
Mango Lassi Recipe For Ataulfo Mango Champagne Mango

Hooray! It’s mango season!!! In the northern hemisphere mango season runs from April through September and that, happy mango lovers and soon to be mango lovers, that is now!

This means many months of mango lassis lie ahead.

To take advantage of this bounty I have included three different mango lassi recipes. Actually, the mango lassi such an easy recipe that all three mango lassi recipes are simply variations on a theme.  If you are trying to get your kids interested in either cooking or eating healthy and are looking for kid-friendly recipes, this easy vegetarian recipe is a great place to start.

Now, there are mangoes and there are mangoes and, just like with any other fruit, each variety has it’s own characteristics.  One of the most popular, and one that is coming into the market right now, is the Ataulfo Mango, otherwise known as the Champagne Mango. It is relatively small, about 4″ long, golden yellow, and paisley shaped.  Champagne mangos are popular because, unlike some other varieties, they have a smooth creamy flesh with no fibrous “strings.” The Toronto Star described the flavor of the Ataulfo as “the love child of peach, banana, pineapple and butter.” They also have much more Vitamin C than other cultivars.

OH and DO NOT put them in the refrigerator for more than a few hours to chill before eating. If you store champagne or ataulfo mangoes in the refrigerator, the flesh will spoil and turn brown and disgusting. The proper way to store a mango is to put it in a ventilated fruit bowl, or other bowl lined with a paper towel or cloth napkin, and leave it out at room temperature.

One thing that I often hear when I talk to people about mangoes is that they aren’t sure how to prepare them.  Don’t worry! It’s easier than you might think. Mangoes all have a flattish oblong pit inside. So, if you are you are dealing with a champagne mango, or any other variety that has no strings, and want to use the flesh for mango lassis or something else where presentation doesn’t matter, the simplest way to prepare an ataulfo mango is this: Cut the cheeks from either side of the pit, then use a spoon to scoop the flesh from the halves and scrape the flesh from the pit. (You can also skip that last step and just suck the flesh off the pit, recipe be damned!)

If you just want to eat them as a snack, simply cut the cheeks into strips and eat the flesh off the rind the way you would eat an orange wedge. Then, as a last step before going to wash the mango juice off your face and hands, suck the remaining flesh off the pit. After all, it’s not as if you’re saving it for an easy recipe 🙂

Enjoy your mango lassis! Marsya 🙂

p.s. If you don’t have, can’t find or don’t like cardamom, rose water, or orange blossom water, you can leave them out of your mango lassi recipe and still have a delicious, refreshing, vegetarian, low-fat treat.

Rose Scented Mango Lassi Recipe

  • 1 cup mango, cut from 1 ataulfo mango aka champagne mango
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 1 quarter cup ice water
  • 4 ice cubes
  • 2 – 4 drops rose water depending on taste (this has a very strong flavor – don’t over do it)
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons sugar

First remove the flesh from a champagne mango, by cutting  the cheeks from either side of the pit, then use a spoon to scoop the flesh from the halves and scrape the flesh from the pit.

Then, put all the ingredients in your blender and blend for 1-2 minutes. Pour into a glass and drink.

Rose Water is available at most Indian and Middle Eastern markets for less than $5/bottle.  It is made from the natural steam distillation of rose petals, and the Swad brand in particular is VERY strongly scented, so use it sparingly.

I recommend using a paring knife to cut a slit in the plastic cover over the mouth of the bottle, then shaking the few drops into a spoon, rather than adding it directly from the bottle.

 Orange Blossom Scented Mango Lassi Recipe

  • 1 cup mango, cut from 1 ataulfo mango aka champagne mango
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 1 quarter cup ice water
  • 4 ice cubes
  • 1 teaspoon orange blossom water depending on taste
  •  1 to 2 tablespoons sugar

First remove the flesh from a champagne mango, by cutting  the cheeks from either side of the pit, then use a spoon to scoop the flesh from the halves and scrape the flesh from the pit.

Then, put all the ingredients in your blender and blend for 1-2 minutes. Pour into a glass and drink.

The Orange Blossom Lassi is my  favorite, but orange blossom water, in addition to being less strongly scented than Rose water, is much harder to find. So, before you head out to your local Middle Eastern or Indian market, call ahead to make sure they carry it. If not, it is quite possible that they can order it for you.

Spice Corner, located at 135 Lexington Avenue, in the area of New York City known as “Curry Hill” carries the Baroody brand for about $4/bottle, as well as a whole range of fresh spices and Indian foods at the best prices in town. I use it not just in my mango lassi, but to perfume my drinking water as well.

 Cardamom Mango Lassi Recipe

  • 1 cup mango, cut from 1 ataulfo mango aka champagne mango
  • 1 quarter cup ice water
  • 4 ice cubes
  • 4 green cardamom pods
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons sugar

First remove the flesh from a champagne mango, by cutting  the cheeks from either side of the pit, then use a spoon to scoop the flesh from the halves and scrape the flesh from the pit.

Then, put all the ingredients in your blender and blend for 1-2 minutes. Pour into a glass and drink.

If this is something you plan to make a lot, or in quantity, you can make a simple syrup  of the cardamom, water and sugar, so that you won’t have the little bits of cardamom pod in your drink. (Though wait until you know how sweet you like them, so you can use the amount of sugar that suits your palate.)

Cardamom Simple Syrup:

Combine the sugar, cardamom pods, and water PLUS 1 TABLESPOON OF WATER in a sauce pan. Bring to a rolling boil and wisk until all the sugar has dissolved. Let cool at room temperature and then store in the refrigerator until you are ready to use it.

This will not be as sweet as a regular simple syrup, but it will keep the proportions correct for this recipe.  For directions on how to make a plain simple syrup, click here.

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